Aubrey J. Kauffman, Break of Dawn

Regular price $1,800.00

Aubrey J. Kauffman, Break of Dawn (God's Landscape series), 2013. Archival Inkjet Print, 36 x 54 inches.


Aubrey J. Kauffman writes of his work: "As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds.

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer."

 

Aubrey J. Kauffman is a New Jersey based fine art photographer. He received a BA from New Jersey City University and his MFA from Rutgers University’s Mason Gross School of the Arts. Kauffman has taught photography at Mason Gross, Middlesex County College and Mercer County Community College.

He was Guest Curator for “Landscapes: Social Political Traditional” at Rider University, in Lawrenceville, NJ, and was Co-Curator for “On Photography: Culture, History and the Narrative” with LaToya Ruby Frazier at the Mason Gross Galleries in New Brunswick. His work has been included in shows at The Newark Museum; The Biggs Museum of American Art The Griffin Museum of Photography, The 38th Annual Wind Challenge Exhibition Series at the Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia, The New Jersey State Museum; 7th and 2nd Street Gallery, New York, NY; Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts and The Awards Show 37 at Perkins Art Center. 

His work is represented in the permanent collections of Rider University, Johnson and Johnson's Corporate Headquarters in New Brunswick, NJ and the New Jersey State museum in Trenton, NJ.