Marguerita Hagan, Argonaut Argo, Argonautidae

Regular price $8,000.00

Argonaut Argo, Argonautidae, Sterling Silver Cradle, 5.75 x 5.25 inches, Wood Base, 8.5 x 8 inches.

Records of Argonauta are date as early as 300 BC. but how long will they last?
Aristotle described the webbed first arms as sails catching the wind and the female’s shell as its boat. This rarely seen octopus is named after the Greek sailors who went on a quest in search of the Golden Fleece protected by the Goddess Hera. These technically savvy arms actually secrete calcium carbonate engineering her exquisite one-chambered shell and like the rest of the body, contain chromatophores enabling it to change color from reflective silver to dark maroon. The Argonaut larvae are equipped with chromatophores and change color at birth.

The shell protects her and her eggs and acts as a buoyancy device. She can regulate the air to float at the surface or sink below in the pelagic zone/open ocean habitat. Exclusively all female argonauts have a shell. The shell-less dwarf male is 10% of the female measuring just a few centimeters (.75”) and the females about 10 centimeters (almost 4”) so this piece is approximately her actual size. The male’s third arm locks inside the female during fertilization and then it breaks off and he dies. The female Argonaut goes on to mate numerous times hatching about 6,500 babies. Argonaut can connect to form chains of 20-30 floating on their sides in the open ocean.
Like all life in the sea, they are in grave danger from human induced pollutants, plastics, ocean acidification and rising temperatures from climate change. Our survival and theirs depend on a global reset of human practices now. Our precious marine ecosystem supports all life on our blue planet and photosynthesizes over 50% of earth’s oxygen providing our every other breath. People protect what they love. Fall in love and help restore the blue heart of our planet now.
Marguerita Hagan is a ceramic sculptor based in Philadelphia. She is an advocate for the thriving of all life in mutually sustainable communities and environments. The concept of interdependence plays throughout her sculpture, teaching and community arts.

Recent work abstracts the elements of marine life from microscopic primary producers to coral reef ecosystems and beyond. The intricate ceramic forms shine light on the wonder and respect for the delicate, diverse and mostly little known life of the sea with which our lives are intrinsically linked. Hagan’s practice is an ongoing discovery, magnifying our reciprocal responsibility within the architecture of these vital gifts. She exhibits and lectures nationally and internationally.
Marguerita Hagan is a ceramic sculptor based in Philadelphia. She is an advocate for the thriving of all life in mutually sustainable communities and environments. The concept of interdependence plays throughout her sculpture, teaching and community arts.

Recent work abstracts the elements of marine life from microscopic primary producers to coral reef ecosystems and beyond. The intricate ceramic forms shine light on the wonder and respect for the delicate, diverse and mostly little known life of the sea with which our lives are intrinsically linked. Hagan’s practice is an ongoing discovery, magnifying our reciprocal responsibility within the architecture of these vital gifts. She exhibits and lectures nationally and internationally.